INTERVIEW WITH KRISTIN B SANDVIK

SONY DSC

 

The Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), has been researching for peace development for about 50 years. What does it take for us to achive peace on earth?

Peace on earth, that’s a big question… Democracy, and The West needs to stay more at home and interfere less in other countries. I would suggest the same thing for countries like Sweden and Norway.

Your lecture will focus on cyberwar and drones, what is meant by ‘cyberwar’, can you define the meaning of the term?

With cyberwar it’s difficult because we all live with cyberattacks everyday, there is a risk of being hacked, having your bank account emptied and so on so forth.

Everything is getting more and more connected, and more connected globally. This makes cyberattacks something you really need to take seriously, but the question is if this is something that has to be seen as cybersecurity and law enforcement or military action.

Is there an ongoing cyberwar right now? What impact does it have on the outside world in such cases?

Some commentators actually welcome cyberwar because they think its going to be less bloody, as we see now, cyberwars or cyberattacks happens as a part of arm struggle.

Your research focuses on the interface between international law, humanitarian, technology and violence. What aroused your interest in these topics?

My background is looking at how people in war try to use law to survive or to get resettled or get protection. I’ve become really interested in how these new technologies shape part of the everyday life on the ground, having an email account for example. But also how the same technology can be used in war as attacks against the population.

You have a PhD in Juridical Sciences from Harvard University, how did you end up there?

Thats a good question, I dont really know. Because I’ve seen Legally Blond too many times. No, but my family has been US-educated for 50 years and they have desperately tried to migrate since 1870. So Harvard was always on my radar.

You may invite a special someone to dinner, who is this person and what is for dinner?

This is when I don’t answer George Michael. Once I was sitting outside my supervisor in Harvard and this really tall and good looking man came out of her office and said ’’good evening’’ and disappeared into the elevator. I wish I had struck up a conversation with him, because my supervisor made him go into politics, she was the main reason he left law practice and became the current president of the United States. So i should have taken him to dinner. And he likes salad.

/Jasmin Dirawi